How To Deal With An Underfunded Children’s Ministry

How To Deal With An Underfunded Children’s Ministry

I had to smile a little after I typed in the title for this post:?…An?Underfunded Children’s Ministry?-?as if there’s any other kind, right? I served in 4 churches and 3 of them were drastically underfunded. The 4th was about where it should be, but certainly still limited.

Virtually all of us who lead in?Children’s Ministry?have to deal with this dilemma – how do we pursue our vision when the funds are limited? And I know there is a very good chance that, not only is that true of your situation, but it’s also probably an understatement. You are probably leading a ministry that is drastically underfunded.

How do you deal with that problem? ?Here are a few things I learned along the way:

How To Deal With An Underfunded Children’s Ministry

1. Get over it.?

Early on, I remember being very upset by the fact that the youth ministry had essentially the same budget as children’s ministry. But they had 1/4 of the kids, a tenth of the volunteers – and they didn’t even have program every service like we did, much less classes for every different age group! And yet they had, essentially, the same budget as we did! I had to get over it. That’s not to say that you can’t bring this fact to the attention of your leaders (in an appropriate way), but get over begrudging the other departments for what they have, or bemoaning the fact that you don’t have enough. Just get over it!

2. Get thankful.?

The fact that, even underfunded, I have more than many really hit home for me after going on a couple of missions trips. One was to Moscow, Russia, where I trained some leaders at a seminary. Wow…were my eyes opened to what I had at my church! They had NOTHING! The 2nd trip was to Perth, Australia – a “western” country that you would think might be somewhat equivalent to here. Nope…the churches I interacted with had virtually no children’s ministry resources. I may have been underfunded, but I had a lot in comparison to many other places. Since these trips I’ve also been to the Peru, Bolivia, Philippines, South Africa, Cameroon & Swaziland to do training – and was reminded over & over again what I do have in my own ministry. I became much more thankful!

3. Get creative.?

For many years I have said this statement in seminars & workshops I’ve taught, and I’ve tried to take it to heart in my own ministry:?The greatest restriction placed on your ministry is not lack of resources, but lack of vision.

I absolutely believe this to be true. When we have a big vision, we look beyond what we lack to what we believe we must accomplish. That compelling vision takes hold of us and our team and instills a creativity that doesn’t otherwise exist. When we find ourselves with a lack of resources we need to think creatively. Rarely in my experience have I decided something just couldn’t be done because of this lack – in almost every case there is a way to get it done if I & my team just think creatively enough!

4. Get help.?

Your funding doesn’t have to come just from the church budget. You can get help in many areas. And it doesn’t have to be in the form of dollars. It can be supplies, equipment, curriculum – just about anything. In the smallest church I served in we moved from a mobile church (meeting at a school) into a new building. But funds were pretty drained with the building, so we didn’t have enough for a play area for our kids. After sharing the vision for this need, up stepped a couple capable of providing this need and that’s exactly what they did. $15000 or so later, we had our playground, and not a single penny came from the church. Do you have needs? Share those needs by leading with a vision (not the need) and see what God does in the hearts of those who have the ability to provide for that need.

5. Get on your knees.?

This point could be put first, or throughout, this entire post. It is the most important and should be the on-going solution to your lack of funds. ?Get on your knees, and get your team on their knees, and ask God to provide. A gal shared in a workshop I taught that her team has actually turned every other leadership team meeting into a prayer meeting. That’s one way they keep it a priority – one time they meet and talk ministry, the next time they meet and just pray together. We forget that, while your ministry may be underfunded, our God is not. Sometimes we don’t have what we need because we simply haven’t asked.

How do you deal with underfunding in your ministry??

(please share in comments below)

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Greg Baird
Founder of Children's Ministry Leader at Children's Ministry Leader
My passion is seeing the lives of children transformed. I believe the best way to do that is to equip leaders in the local church to serve children, volunteers and parents to invest in the lives of children at church and in the home. That?s what we do here at Children?s Ministry Leader ? equip leaders to create healthy Children?s & Family Ministry.
I serve as the Vice President of Global Resources in the Global Mission department at David C. Cook.

I love what I do as it is the outflow of 25 years of ministry experience as Children?s, Family & Administrative Pastor, consultant, trainer, speaker and short-term missions leader.

2 Responses to How To Deal With An Underfunded Children’s Ministry

  1. Underfunded? Try no funding at all! Everything our kids ministry had was either donated by one amazing guy or came out of my wallet I did kids ministry for 26 years & I spent something close to $1,000 a year
    Went to the leadership many times & got told “It’s only kids ministry, you don’t need money for that”
    I stayed for the kids but have to say I felt like I was beating my head against a brick wall trying to impart the value of the kids into the leadership 🙁

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Here’s a great resource to offer your families, created by our friends Sweet Sleep. And it’s free!

Check it out!

#VBS #SweetSleepWelcome to the Sweet Sleep Family Experience!
Join us this summer as we explore what life is like for children and families in Uganda. The program is designed to help families have fun experiences together, while learning some important truths about how God provides True Rest, and how we can learn to love and serve others as He calls us to do.

Check out our website for access to all of these FREE activities 🎉
sweetsleep.org/programs/familyexperience/
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Fun is not a 4-letter word. 🙂


#kidmin #youthmin #stumin #fammin #childrensministry #childrensministryleader #kidsministry #pastors #church #ministry
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Stop begging trying to fill the needs in your ministry! IF people respond, it will likely be only short term. Obligatory service doesn’t inspire people to stick around.

Instead, understand the grand vision we are pursuing by investing in children’s lives for eternity!

Practice articulating that vision and start sharing it in every conversation. It’s a privilege and honor to be part of such important service, so INVITE people into that opportunity.

And, of course, never forget the foundation for building our team, found in Luke 10:2: “These were his [Jesus’] instructions to them: ‘The harvest is great, but the workers are few. So pray to the Lord who is in charge of the harvest; ask him to send more workers into his fields.’”


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As the kids run to their waiting parents after church on Sunday morning, is that where the impact ends?

Or does the conversation continue at home throughout the week?

Hopefully the answer is the latter. If it’s not, it’s probably because we aren’t engaging and equipping parents to continue the conversation.

And that’s a problem.

Parents are the primary spiritual investors in a child’s life. Good or bad, this is almost always true.

As Children’s Ministry Leaders, our primary role ought to be to “equip God’s people” (Ephesians 4:12). In our case, I believe that means equip our team to invest in the children of our ministry, and to equip the parents of those children to continue the conversations at home.

If you aren’t engaging & equipping parents to continue the conversations that begin at church, then your ministry is incomplete.

If you are engaging and equipping parents, share an example in the comments of how you do that so the rest of us can learn from you.





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We always hear that children and youth are the church of tomorrow.

Yes, they are.

But they are also part of the church of today.

They are the group most receptive to the Gospel. They are the group most responsive to discipleship.

They also typically represent the largest group in the church, and the one with the most peripheral impact (volunteers, parents, etc).

They are the most vulnerable, physically, spiritually, emotionally and mentally.

Why on earth would we ever think we could “babysit” this group while “real ministry” happens with adults?

The truth is, many (most?) churches are not as healthy or strong as they could be because they lack a thriving focus on perhaps the very group that should receive the greatest focus.

You cannot have a healthy church without a healthy ministry to children and families.

Agree?






#KidMin #YouthMin #StuMin #ChildrensMinistry #FamMin #Pastors #Church #Ministry
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