Why Being A Children’s Ministry Leader Is Not Primarily About The Kids

Why Being A Children’s Ministry Leader Is Not Primarily About The Kids

It's not about the kids. This is the second of a 5 part series on things I’ve learned while being a Children’s Pastor. Lesson #1 was: The Most Important Person In Your Ministry Is…YOU! 

Critical Children’s Ministry Leadership Lesson #2: 

Being a Children’s Pastor is not primarily about the kids.

OK, let me qualify this statement: our end-goals are ultimately about the spiritual formation of children, but what I do as a Children’s Pastor to meet those goals should be primarily adult-focused.

Specifically, as a church leader my role is to equip others. Here’s what scripture says:

“Their (church leaders) responsibility is to equip God’s people to do His work and build up the church, the body of Christ. Ephesians 4:12”

I’ve been blessed to lead children’s ministries in churches from 250 to 7000 set in many different environments. It doesn’t matter – my job is to equip others to do the work of the ministry. Says so right there in Ephesians (and you can read more about it here: The One Sentence Children’s Ministry Leader Job Description).

Our tendency, however, is to get so caught up in the minors that we forget about the majors. We worry about curriculum and resources and program and facilities and…and…and.

These are all important – critical non-negotiables, in fact – but they aren’t the most important elements for my focus (and, yes, the smaller the church the harder it is to remain focused on the important things). Aside from growing myself as a spiritual leader (see Critical Children’s Ministry Leadership Lesson #1), my most important responsibility is to equip others to do the work of ministry.

In my opinion, that means two things:

1. Developing your team around you (staff and/or core leaders)

Your ministry will only grow to the level that you and your team can take it.

2. Equipping parents to disciple their children

Spiritual formation of kids in your ministry will primarily happen only to the extent of their parents investment in that process.

So I need to daily ask myself questions such as:

  • What have I done today to grow myself as the leader of this ministry?
  • Who and how have I equipped someone else today to do the work of the ministry?
  • What can I equip someone else to do so that I am focused on what only I can do?
  • How is our ministry intentionally designed to partner with parents in equipping them to disciple their own children?

I’ll share the third lesson I’ve learned as a children’s pastor in the next post. For now . . .

What have you learned about your central focus as a Children’s Ministry Leader? 

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Greg Baird
Founder of Children's Ministry Leader & Vice President of Global Resources at David C Cook

The most important thing to know about me is that I am blessed beyond measure to have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ, to have married way over my head to my wife, Michele, and that I have two incredible grown sons named Taylor and Garret.


I serve as the Vice President of Global Resources in the Global Mission department at David C. Cook.


I love what I do as it is the outflow of 25 years of ministry experience as Children’s, Family & Administrative Pastor, consultant, trainer, speaker and short-term missions leader.


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